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Router Table Plans to Make the Best DIY Router Table

Making your own router table has never been as easy as it is today. So we've scoured the internet to get you the best router table plans that will take your woodworking to a whole new level.

The best part about constructing your own router table is that you get to improve your woodworking skills and create your custom workspace all at once. These table plans are easy to follow and suitable for beginner, intermediate, and advanced woodworkers.

What is a DIY Router Table Plan?

A router table plan is a set of instructions that details the steps you should take when creating your own router table. Constructing your own router table is an adventure and will cost you a fraction of what you would have spent on a new router table.

We've selected the best router table plans that are perfect for beginners and any other woodworker interested in constructing their own router table.

Now that we know what the table plans are all about, let's dive into the best router table plans.

1. Patrick’s Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Intermediate

Tools Needed: tape measure, speed square, pencil, bits, saw, pocket hole jig, and safety gear

Time: Over 8 hours

Patrick's router table plan may need you to have a bit more experience than some of our other DIY router table plans on this list. We won't lie that building this free DIY router table will be a walk in the park. However, we can promise that by the time you'll be done with this process, your skills in the woodworking shop will have greatly increased.

The pocket hole jig will come in very handy while you build your own router table. Another thing to note is that you will spend most of your allotted budget on the materials for these router tables. In addition, the drawers, rollers, finish coats, and other accessories will add to the cost.

Your drawer-making skills will improve immensely after you construct this router table. First, of course, you'll need your typical power tool to cut, drill, and assemble the parts. This free DIY router table takes time to build because you'll need to assemble the different drawers in the plan.

2. Jeff Branch Table Saw Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Beginner

Tools Needed: tape measure, clamps, pencil, drill, and bits, saw, jigs, router and bits, and safety gear

Time: About 4 hours

These table plans are one of the easiest to execute. Even if you are a novice, you can still make these DIY router table plans work. Unlike our first pick above, these DIY router table plans are easier to construct. This router table is more of a simple box-like structure that is easier to make.

You can make the grooves for the tracks using a saw or routing them out. Nonetheless, ensure that you use the right tools to avoid damaging the panels. Although the estimated construction time is 4 hours, you may spend more time if you choose to cut the T-tracks grooves using a saw.

3. Fine Woodworking DIY Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Beginner

Tools Needed: tape measure, pencil, drill, and bits, saw, pencil, and safety gear

Time: About 4 hours

This is one of the most minimalistic DIY router table plans that you'll come across. If you are a beginner and are just getting started and want to build your own router table, we recommend that you start with this option.

You don't need special jigs or tools. You'll use the saw to cut and the drill to finish everything up. These free router table plans were made with the beginner in mind. All you need is a quiet afternoon in your popular woodworking area and the materials you need.

You can also use scrap wood that is lying around your popular woodworking shop. These free plans are the best and you can get started on your projects as soon as you're done.

4. Woodgears Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Advanced

Tools Needed: tape measure, drill, and bits, clamps, saw and jigs, pencil, router bit, and safety gear

Time: Over 8 hours

Here's another new router table plan that will require some router bits, a lot of patience, skill, and dedication. However, most of the woodwork will go to the cutting and joinery bit. When you decide to build a router table, you should go over the DIY router table plans and see which ones fit your skill level, budget, and available time.

If you have a power saw or a dovetail saw that you could sie for the small joinery cuts, the better. Be prepared to productively spend at least two or more days to build your own router if you choose to go with these table plans. You'll need to do several repeated cuts, and doing the drawers and cabinet frame might take up most of your time.

This is one of the most expensive table plans on this list. However, you can expect to have a sturdy and worthwhile DIY router table after.

5. Popular Woodworking Three Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Intermediate

Tools Needed: tape measure, pencil, drill and bits, clamps, saw and jigs, router and bits, and safety gear

Time: About 4 hours

The complexity level on this router table plan is intermediate because of the joinery box. Otherwise, even a beginner can bring these DIY router table plans to life. Your everyday tools should be enough o build a router table using these plans.

The clamps are to hold the table in place while you work. The total cost of construction using these table plans will range from cheap to very affordable. No worries about breaking your bank.

6. Woodsmith Shop Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Advanced

Tools Needed: tape measure, pencil, drill, bits, saw, router and bits, and safety gear

Time: About 6 hours

If you are an advanced woodworking expert and want a detailed router table, this plan is for you. This is not an easy-to-do benchtop router table and will require some dedication on your part. Your router table will have acrylic cutting, electrical parts, and you will need to use some contact cement.

You can still use your typical woodworking tools as you implement these table plans; however, if you have a miter saw or other smaller hand saws, the better. You can use these woodworking saws to do the joinery and angled cuts.

The router bits will also come in handy. Be prepared to exercise a lot of patients when using these table plans. However, the result will have you smiling and grateful that you took the time to build your own DIY router table.

If you want to finish building your router table with a bang, you can use a good finish coat. However, note that these materials, including the finish coat and the acrylic, make the construction of this router table more expensive than the rest.


7. Joshmt2012 Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Intermediate

Tools Needed: tape measure, pencil, drill, bits, saw, router and bits, and safety gear

Time: About 6 hours

The one thing that makes these router table plans for the intermediate level are the wiring, dust collector, and the legs. Otherwise, a complete novice would be able to make this router table from scratch.

You can use a woodworking jigsaw if you are completely new to the woodworking craft. Getting access to a table saw or a solid miter saw can be a challenge. However, ensure that you use the correct blade that will not damage your plywood sheets.

The support fence and the legs of this router table fence are what takes most of the time. Otherwise, you can be done within three hours of dedicated work. Cutting, laying out, and assembling does not take up a lot of your time.

If you are a beginner in this woodworking area, we advise that you get some help when building the dust collecter of this router table. You can ask a more advanced and skilled woodworker to help you out. If you can't find it, you can always watch a YouTube video of someone using these table plans. 

8. Our Home From Scratch Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Intermediate

Tools Needed: tape measure, pencil, drill, bits, saws, and safety gear

Time: About 4-8 hours

If this is the first time using router table plans to make a DIY router table, we recommend that you get extra melamine. The part that will require you to put in a bit more effort is making the T-track grooves. So, again, you may need to get some extra help if you are a novice.

Avoid using a normal saw tooth configuration as this may damage the melamine. You can start with a high tooth count, to begin with. Nonetheless, ensure that you are using a blade designed to cut through melamine without damaging it.

You can rejoice when using these router table plans because you won't have to construct any drawers or cabinet framing. You might find that constructing this router table is as easy as constructing a benchtop router table.

Implementing these DIY router table plans is budget-friendly. You can use melamine that you get on sale, and the other materials for this router table are also fairly cheap. However, if you don't have a proper saw blade, you may need to invest in one when making this router table.

9. Thinking Wood 3 In 1 Workbench Router Table Plans

Complexity level: Advanced

Tools Needed: tape measure, pencil, drill, bits, saws, router and bits, straight edge, and safety gear

Time: Over 8 hours

Finally, we have table plans that require you to be an expert in the woodworking arena. This is not your simple benchtop router table, and you will need to use advanced tools and procedures. Nonetheless, if you are a beginner in the woodworking area, you can work hand in hand with an advanced player.

These router table plans are to build a full-size router table. Once you follow the instructions carefully, you'll have a table saw and a router table. If you are a beginner, your skill levels will skyrocket after making this router table.

Your drill or driver will be a very handy tool during this project. These table plans require a lot of time and patience on your part. The number of fasteners and the amount of lumber for this project makes it a bit pricey.

If you require a circular saw to mount on the table, you may need to dig deeper into your pockets. Nonetheless, be prepared for the best router table that will take your woodwork to another level.

What Are the Features of A DIY Router Table?

1. Storage

A good router table plan should incorporate a deep drawer that will allow you to corral all of your routers and other accessories. This big and convenient space allows you to have a seamless workflow as you'll be able to find what you need faster.

You'll know exactly where to find the bit that you need within no time.

2. Double Dust Collection

Vacuum ports will give you suction above and below your router bit. Therefore, having these vacuum ports in the cabinet and the fence will go a long way in ensuring that you get work done more efficiently.

This double dust collection feature also makes your DIY router table one of the cleanest machines in your woodworking space.

3. MDF Construction

The one advantage of using MDF for the top, cabinet, and fence is that it offers great stability. A good MDF board will stay flat no matter what you're working on. MDF is also heavy, and this adds to the stability that it brings to your DIY router table.

The extra weight that MDF brings to your DIY router table dampens the router vibration and provides great stability.

4. Convenient Switch

Having a switch to switch off and on with your knee is a great idea as you build a router table. Your hands will be free to hold the workpiece. You'll be able to switch your router on without having to open the cabinet door.

5. Tough Work Surface

Although it might be a bit more expensive to laminate your work surface, it's better to do so. If you've been working with wood for some time, you know that wood can be abrasive. Therefore, you want to protect your work surface from the wood you're working with.

The last thing you need is for the wood to grind away at your surface and its finishes. However, if you laminate your work surface in the fence face on your free router table, you won't have to worry about this.

Your DIY router table will remain smooth and slick for years to come.

6. Adjustable Fence

A good DIY router table is fully adjustable. You should slide the fence face and get an opening that is up to 3 inches wide. You can also add a good pair of clamps that will lock the fence in position.

This design will ensure that your DIY router table is reliable and efficient.

7. Solid Top

Having a rock-solid top is a great thing to consider. Having a 3/4-inch MDF top sandwiched between layers of 1/4-inch hardboard is a great idea for bringing your DIY router table plans to life. Like we stated in point 5, having a solid worktop is a necessity.

This top type is unlikely to sag, warp, or flex no matter what you're working on.

8. Portable

You want your DIY router table to be sturdy but movable. Ensure that the glides you choose will not wobble and will allow you to move your router table when you want to.

Conclusion

Which DIY router table plan did you love the most? Let us know how your router table project goes. Remember to choose the table plans that suit your level of expertise, budget, available tools, and amount of time to spare.